Charitable Trust

HOPE not hate

New Education team helps schools challenge prejudice and understand far-right signs and threats

posted by: Owen Jones | on: Friday, 3 March 2017, 18:01


Young people have more inclusive views than ever, but can still struggle with understanding prejudice and inequality; schools also need to understand the threat posed by the far right – part of the challenges being met by our new Education team.

Since the hate crime spike witnessed after last summer’s Referendum, HOPE not hate has witnessed an unprecedented demand to speak to young people in schools and their teachers about the challenges of racism and the need to promote more inclusive environments.

Starting with pilot testing last year, this year we’ve begun delivering workshops and talks to schools around the country – all free of charge, thanks to a generous grant.

Our research shows that young people have more inclusive views than ever, and embrace multiculturalism much for enthusiastically than previous generations. Which is great news. But our work is still cut out for us, and the anti-racism (and other -isms) message needs to up its game with young people.

Racism/sexism/homophobia are all ‘bad’ and young people know that. But aside from these core themes, do they really understand what prejudice means on a day-to-day level? Do they understand the use of lazy language, how inequality often starts from birth, and that there are other embedded historical structures in society that prevent genuine equality between genders, ethnic groups and other minorities struggling for holistic acceptance in today’s Britain?

Could they even (unwittingly) be contributing to these inequalities or prejudice without realising…?

These are the issues and lessons we debate in schools today and we’re keen to have those debates – with a certain degree of urgency, too.

First conference

During the Spring half-term a room full of education professionals met in central London from the across the country for the launch of our brand new education programme, looking to address those issues above, as well as hear our expertise on dealing with stereotypes and educating around the far right.

The group was presented with HOPE not hate’s vision for the project – a three-layered programme covering harmful language, far-right awareness and teacher training – as well as our plan of taking our skills from community organising right into the classroom, offering schools a very different experience to other charities in this sector.

It was wonderful to be able to tap into the huge amount of high-class experience in the room, to help us tailor the programmes and messaging to be as useful to schools as possible across the different educational key stages. This was followed by a fascinating debate about the differing nature the nature of the problems and threats faced around the country.

We are now proud to have an advisory board chaired by an Ofsted-rated educational specialist (and long-term HOPE not hate volunteer), which will help us keep up-to-date with what is occurring in British classrooms and ensure that we continue to tailor and improve our offerings to the educational sector.

Our future plans include “Train the Trainer” classes for teachers around the country and further developing our work with sport, to making it as engaging as we can for students with different learning styles.

Owen Jones is Head of Education at HOPE not hate

If you’re a teacher or educational specialist interested in learning more about our Education team’s work, please contact us: [email protected]



 Posted: 3 Mar 2017 | There are 0 comments


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